Hotfile getting hotter: The cyberlocker site fires back at Warner Bros.

By Nickolas B. Solish

This is a follow-up to “Cyberlocker sites come under the radar of copyright holders,” which ran in the Daily Journal on Aug. 19.

Striking back against its accusers, the file-hosting website Hotfile.com has brought a countersuit against Warner Bros. Entertainment alleging copyright fraud and abuse.  The complaint accuses Warner Bros. of abusing Hotfile’s anti-piracy tool by filing false copyright take-downs notices.  These notices are only to be used for copyrighted files owned by Warner Bros..  Now the Florida-based company is seeking damages from the movie giant.

The complaint comes after an earlier suit this year against Hotfile by the Motion Picture Association of America, an association of five major Hollywood studios.  The suit is based on a larger campaign by the MPAA to attack copyright abuse on cyber-locker sites.  A cyberlocker is an online storage provider that allows users to upload and share files.  Visitors to the site then can download those files for free by clicking a link.

Cyberlocker sites came under the attention of the MPAA due to a spike in traffic since the beginning of 2011.  These sites now receive more traffic than BitTorrent sites, bringing them under scrutiny by the major studios.  Hotfile recently became one of the top 100 visited websites in the world.

Hotfile’s recent suit against Warner Bros. is a counter-claim to the original MPAA action.  The counterclaim accuses Warner Bros. of “repeated, reckless and irresponsible misrepresentations to Hotfile falsely claiming to own copyrights in material from Hotfile.com.”  The complaint goes on to say that Hotfile even told Warner Bros. about these misrepresentations, but even this did not stop the false claims.

To fight copyright abuse, Hotfile provides “special rightsholder accounts” to certain copyright owners.  Warner Bros. had such an account assigned to their manager of anti-piracy Internet operations, Michael Bentkover.  The tool allowed an unlimited amount of file-takedowns by copyright holders, so long as the complainant held the copyright to the file.

Many of the files taken down by Warner Bros. were not files for which they owned copyrights.  Hotfile alleges this was a breach of the special rightsholder account agreement, which provided that when Warner Bros. reported a file, it was asserting “under penalty of perjury that [it is] the owner or an owner or an authorized legal representative of the owner of copyrights.”  Warner Bros. also represented that it had a “good faith belief” that the owner did not authorize use of the file on Hotfile.com.

Warner Bros. is accused of “willful blindness” in its use of the special rightsholder account.  The complaint points out that Warner Bros. searched for a file entitled “The Rite,” which had been uploaded to filesonic.net, not Hotfile.com.  “[B]ecause Warner apparently went to a third party search site looking for links to The Rite, it returned a page containing not only the filesonic link to The Rite but also dozens of seemingly unrelated links to other files at filsonic.com, Hotfile.com and other sites.”  Warner then “used the [special rightsholder account] to delete each of the twenty or so Hotfile links listed on that page even though . . . none appear to have any relationship to The Rite or to Warner.”  Warner Bros. is accused of deleting “hundreds if not thousands” of similar files in this manner.

Interestingly, there is speculation that Warner Bros. had a financial incentive other than preventing infringement for taking these files down.  A deal was proposed by Warner Bros. to replace files removed for infringement with links to purchase Warner-owned content.  If Warner Bros. takes down more files, they create more links to paid content sites.

The three counts Hotfile alleges are violations of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, intentional interference with a contractual or business relationship, and negligence.  The complaint demands a jury trial and asks for compensation for lost revenues caused by Warner Bros’s actions.  Finally, the complaint asks for a permanent injunction requiring Warner Bros. to individually review every file they request to be taken down.

This suit and the original MPAA suit have the potential to greatly alter the legal landscape for cyberlocker sites on the Internet.  Hotfile’s countersuit will also clarify how much legal recourse websites have against big copyright holders under the DMCA.  A trial date has not yet been set.

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